The World's Religions






DURING the Alexandrian sojourn of Jesus, Gonod, and Ganid, the young man spent much of his time and no small sum of his father's money making a collection of the teachings of the world's religions about God and his relations with mortal man. Ganid employed more than threescore learned translators in the making of this abstract of the religious doctrines of the world concerning the Deities. And it should be made plain in this record that all these teachings portraying monotheism were largely derived, directly or indirectly, from the preachments of the missionaries of Machiventa Melchizedek, who went forth from their Salem headquarters to spread the doctrine of one God -- the Most High -- to the ends of the earth.

There is presented herewith an abstract of Ganid's manuscript, which he prepared at Alexandria and Rome, and which was preserved in India for hundreds of years after his death. He collected this material under ten heads, as follows:





--Presented by the Midwayer Commission, from the Urantia Papers.





Cynicism
The residual teachings of the disciples of Melchizedek, excepting those which persisted in the Jewish religion, were best preserved in the doctrines of the Cynics.


Judaism
The Kenites of Palestine salvaged much of the teaching of Melchizedek, and from these records, as preserved and modified by the Jews, Jesus and Ganid made the following selection:


Buddhism
Ganid was shocked to discover how near Buddhism came to being a great and beautiful religion without God, without a personal and universal Deity.


Hinduism
The missionaries of Melchizedek carried the teachings of the one God with them wherever they journeyed. Much of this monotheistic doctrine, together with other and previous concepts, became embodied in the subsequent teachings of Hinduism.


Zoroasterianism
Zoroaster was himself directly in contact with the descendants of the earlier Melchizedek missionaries, and their doctrine of the one God became a central teaching in the religion which he founded in Persia.


Suduanism (Jainism)
The third group of religious believers who preserved the doctrine of one God in India -- the survival of the Melchizedek teaching -- were known in those days as the Suduanists. Latterly these believers have become known as followers of Jainism.


Shinto
Only recently had the manuscripts of this Far-Eastern religion been lodged in the Alexandrian library.


Taoism
The messengers of Melchizedek penetrated far into China, influencing several Chinese religions, especially Taoism.


Confucianism
Even the least God-recognizing of the world's great religions acknowledged the monotheism of the Melchizedek missionaries and their persistent successors.


Our Religion
Ganid set himself to the task of formulating what he deemed to be a summary of the belief he had arrived at regarding God as a result of Jesus' teaching.


Return from The World's Religions to Home